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Single Herb Extracts, C-F

 
   
 

Calamus Extract, 2 oz.
Acorus calamus

Sweet flag is considered to be one of the herbs of choice for rejuvenation of the brain and nervous system, but it is also used, in moderation, to tonify the appetite, digestive, and eliminatory systems. It is a vermifuge. This herb is also sometimes used to promote access to the unconscious.

The Ayurvedic Pharmacopoeia of India discusses the use of the dried rhizomes as a brain tonic in cases where there is weak memory, psychoneurosis and epilepsy. Some sources also refer to Vacha as an anti-stammering herb.

Alcohol: 59-61%

Contents: 1:4 extract of organically grown Acorus calamus root in Distilled Water, Organic Alcohol, and Vegetable Glycerin.

$

Cat's Claw Extract, 2 oz.
Uncaria tomentosa

Uncaria tomentosa is a rain forest herb with demonstrated anti-inflammatory properties. It is therefore often used for people with rheumatoid arthritis. Preliminary studies suggest that cat's claw slows tumor growth and that it enhances immunity. It is safe in the recommended doses; side effects are usually associated with possible allergic reactions to plants in the Rubiaceae family.

As more and more studies are being conducted, interest in cat's claw has come to include AIDS (in conjunction with Jergon Sacha) and Lyme disease. There are a few studies suggesting that this herb is capable of such actions because it is not only a superb free-radical scavenger but also promotes the repair of DNA.

Alcohol: 45%

Contents: extract of Uncaria tomentosa bark in distilled water, organic grain alcohol, and pure vegetable glycerin.

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Cayenne Extract, 1 oz.
Capsicum minimum

Bird peppers are very hot chilis that are, as the color suggests, high in vitamin A. Cayenne is good for the eyes and circulation. It relieves congestion and promotes metabolism. In Hawaii, it is used to treat ulcers and many people use it for dyspepsia. It is very stimulating so attention should be put on potentially dramatic changes in peristalsis.

Alcohol: 60%

Contents: extract of Capsicum minimum fruit 1:3 in organic grain alcohol and distilled water.

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Chaparral Extract, 2 oz.
Larrea tridentata herb

Other Medical Connections: Cancer researchers first became interested when an 87 year old man cured a facial cancer by consuming chaparral. Scientists at the University of Nevada investigated the activity of NDGA and found that it was a potent inhibitor of mitochondrial enzymes, which in turn inhibits cancer growth. While no clinical data exists to support using chaparral for cancer therapy, thousands of testimonials credit it for tumor remissions and complete cures. Other medical evidence indicates chaparral is an anti-inflammatory, and antimicrobial agent and a possible treatment for asthma. Research continues to uncover it's mode of action and other potential therapeutic uses.

Current Status in the Marketplace: After allegations in 1992 of liver toxicity associated with chaparral consumption, manufacturers voluntarily restricted sales until the reports were investigated. Following a lengthy review, a panel of medical experts concluded "no clinical data was found... to indicate chaparral is inherently a hepatic toxin. " In late 1994 this report was submitted to the FDA and the product was subsequently given a clean bill of health by the American Herbal Products Association (AHPA). After comparing the quantity of chaparral consumed each year to the number of product complaints, industry regulators concluded chaparral did not pose a significant threat to consumer safety.

Alcohol: 75%

Contents: extract of leafy tips of Larrea tridentata in distilled water, organic grain alcohol, and pure vegetable glycerin.

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Chaste Berry Extract, 2 oz.
Vitex agnus castus

Chaste berries are female hormone regulators, especially where there is excess estrogen and low progesterone. This herb is the cornerstone of many Western gynecological programs, including the menstrual cycle, infertility, and menopause. It is thought to work through the pituitary body, not directly on the hormones of the reproductive system. The berries are also used to relieve paralysis and nerve pain.

Alcohol: 40%

Contents: Vitex agnus castus, fresh fruit and organic grain alcohol.

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Cilantro Drops, 2 oz. Herbal Extract
Coriandrum sativum

According to research by Dr. Yoshiaki Omura, cilantro (leaves) promote removal of certain toxic metals, such as mercury, lead, and aluminum. The product needs to be used very carefully and in conjunction with other herbs that support organ function and proper elimination of the metals.

Alcohol: 24-26%

Contents: Organic Coriandrum sativum leaf tincture, distilled water, and organic grain alcohol.

$

Codonopsis Extract, 2 oz.
Codonopsis Tangshen

Codonopsis is sometimes referred to as the poor man's ginseng. It is rich in saponins and has a capacity to penetrate and cleanse tissues. It is considered particularly beneficial to the lungs, spleen, and stomach. Research shows that it reduces blood pressure and increases immunity and hemoglobin. It is an adaptogen and supports the adrenals. There is significant research suggesting that use of codonopsis during and after radiation treatment can be very helpful.

Alcohol: 24-26%

Contents: Codonopsis Tangshen root in distilled water, organic alcohol, and vegetable glycerin.

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Dan Shen Extract, 2 oz.
Salvia miltiorrhiza

Dan shen is a kind of sage with very red roots. It is commonly regarded as a blood moving herb, i.e., one used to improve circulation as well as the condition of the arteries and overall physiological functioning. Unlike most such herbs, it is not contraindicated for use by persons already taking anticoagulants though careful monitoring is, of course, advised, especially by Asian patients. Dan shen can also be used following traumatic injury, surgery, or any kind of blood loss.

Alcohol: 24-26%

Contents: extract of Salvia miltiorrhiza root 1:3 in distilled water, organic alcohol, and vegetable glycerin.

$

Dong Quai Extract, 2 oz.
Angelica sinensis

Dong quai is probably the second most valued herb in Chinese medicine and is often referred to as a sort of ginseng for women. It is used to balance the female reproductive system and is particularly useful during the critical period of puberty and menopause, but it also helps with the monthly cycle. It is a general tonic herb for almost all issues faced by women, everything from hormone balance to bleeding and the aftermath of giving birth to a baby. It is even used for headaches that are caused by blood insufficiency. Dong quai is a Chinese kind of angelica and should be considered by anyone who is discontinuing use of hormonal medications.

Alcohol: 49-51%

Contents: extract of Angelica sinensis root in organic alcohol, distilled water, and vegetable glycerin.

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Echinacea Extract, 2 oz.
Echinacea angustifolia

Echinacea is a Native American herb with a long history of use, mainly by the Plains Indians. It is perhaps one of the best known immune potentiators but its efficacy is greatest when taken preventatively rather than after symptoms begin to manifest.

Alcohol: 45%

Contents: fresh Echinacea angustifolia root in organic grain alcohol.

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Eleuthero Root Extract, 2 oz.
Eleutherococcus senticosus

Eleutherococcus senticosus is an adaptogen but not a true ginseng. It is sometimes called pseudo or Siberian ginseng but it is not actually a ginseng. It has blood sugar lowering effects and has been shown to bind estrogen receptors and stimulate T-lymphocyte activity and natural killer cell production. It is normally taken to increase coping margins and stamina, but it sometimes stimulates in a manner that makes it necessary to observe patients with hypertension carefully before using higher than recommended dosages. In China, this herb is taken by those suffering from bone marrow suppression following chemotherapy and radiation.

Alcohol: 40%

Contents: Eleutherococcus senticosus in distilled water, organic grain alcohol, and pure vegetable glycerin.

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Fenugreek Extract, 2 oz.
Trigonella foenum-graecum

Fenugreek is used in Ayurvedic medicine to lower blood sugar and reduce cholesterol. It works by delaying absorption of glucose because of balanced chemical structure. In Western herbal medicine, it has been used to promote breast development, lactation, and libido; reduce PMS and menopausal symptoms; regulate blood sugar; and aid thinking. It is high in antioxidants and is used to retard aging. It is nutritive and used for convalescing patients as well as those suffering from anorexia.

Alcohol: 34-36%

Contents: extract of organically grown Trigonella foenum-graecum seeds in Distilled Water, Organic Alcohol, and Vegetable Glycerin.

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Stone Breaker Extract, 2 oz.
Phyllanthus amarus

Phyllanthus amarus in known in South America as "chanca piedra" or breaker of stones. There, it is used mainly for kidney stones but also for gall stones and many other disorders ranging from malaria to liver cancer. In Ayurvedic medicine Phyllanthus amarus is known as bhumi amalaki. It is revered as a major detoxifying and liver rejuvenative herb. It is recommended that it be used in small amounts over a long period of time. Modern studies support traditional uses and suggest that Phyllanthus amarus prevents mutation of liver cells when exposed to carcinogens.

Alcohol: 39-41%

Contents: Phyllanthus amarus leaf extract, 1:3, in Distilled Water, Organic Alcohol, and Vegetable Glycerin.

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Wild Yam Extract, 2 oz. [Formerly called Dioscorea]
Dioscorea villosa

As the doctrine of signatures might suggest, wild yam is spleen tonic. It is antispasmodic and used to quell nausea, especially during pregnancy. One of its chief constituents is a steroidal saponin that is used in rheumatoid arthritis treatment, but the herb as a whole is demulcent, nourishing, soothing, and tonifying. It makes an excellent supplement for people suffering from deficiency conditions, especially during convalescence or after the age of 65.

Alcohol: 50%

Contents: Dioscorea villosa, fresh root and organic grain alcohol.

$

 


Sacred Medicine Sanctuary
Poulsbo, Washington


Copyright by Sacred Medicine Sanctuary 2011

 

*The material provided on this site is for informational purposes only. The author is not a medical doctor. The statements made represent the author's personal opinions and are not intended to replace the services of health care professionals. The content and products discussed have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. The information on this page and the products available on this site are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.